Observatory Open Week

Our second public open week of the 2014/2015 season will be taking place at our observatory on the following dates:

Monday 15th December until Saturday 20th December inclusive from 7:30pm to 9pm.

Please note that we will only be open if the sky is clear.

The Moon and most planets will be out of view during this week, so we are expecting to see some deep sky objects. These include nebulae, star clusters and even other galaxies!

As the winter seems to have finally arrived this year, we recommend that you wrap up warm and wear sensible footwear - the ground can get rather muddy leading up to the dome.

Our usual admission charges will apply - £2.50 for adult and £1.50 for children.

Beginners Course

New to astronomy? The Society holds 2 beginners course during the winter months usually Oct/Nov and Feb/March.
Course places are limited to 20 per course.

See below for more information.

Social Astronomy Evenings

We are now running some additional 'social' meetings on the first and third Tuesday of each month.

The meetings are open to members and non-members and the aim is to provide an informal environment with no set agenda, in which people can meet up in the club room and chat about current astronomical events, astronomy in general or maybe turn up to :

The Stars by Night - a guidebook to planning an evenings observations

Ever wondered about doing a  simple observing program.

This one is about as simple as it gets - observe one star each night - for every night for a whole year.

About 150 years ago this was the aim of a local amateur astronomer and he published a guidebook to help other observers undertake the observing plan.

Now the guidebook is being re-released by a local publisher.

For more details check out this blog....

http://www.starlight-nights.co.uk/stars-night-night

 

Meteor Showers

The Autumn and Winter of 2014-15 promise the potential for some good shooting star observing.
The first major shower of the Autumn are the Draconids - these are active around the 10th October. They are the left-overs from a well known comet Goacobini-Zinner and on occasion they can have quite a good showing.
The Moon will be nearly full so it will be a challenge to see this shower in 2014.
Next comes the Orionids - these are active from 16th to 27th October with a peak on the 20th/21st. There will be a nearly new Moon on this night so get ready for some hours spent tracking these down. Orion rises at around 11pm so you need to stay up late or get up very early to see this shower as they are best viewed after midnight.

The Summer Milky Way

This image was taken at around midnight local time on Saturday 23rd August, from a campsite at Adderstone Field during Scarborough & Ryedale Astronomical Society's annual StarFest.
The image is of the Summer Milky Way - Our galaxy - actually only a major part of it, and was taken with a Canon 60Da fitted with a Vivitar 8mm F3.5 Fish-eye lens on a tripod. The exposure was about 45 seconds at ISO 2000.
You can see the starfields of Cygnus and much more.
Enjoy

The Winter Night Sky

December sees the hieight of the stargazing season as we round the winter equinox on the 21st/22nd December. 

During this time there are no planets to see in thr early evening but there is a good opportunity to view the Geminid Meteor Shower of the nights of 13th and 14th December.

More details in the enclosed notes and images

Rosetta update

Rosetta - the space-trotting probe has entered into orbit around Comet C-G.
This the first stage in a complex manouvre to eventuay land a probe on the Comet's surface as it begins its journey into the inner solar system.
read about this latest news here...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28659783
Quite a picture of the Comet!

Astronomy from Namibia

Here is a link to some of the many images that were taken during the last week of May 2014 from Tivoli Astro Farm, about 180Km out of Windhoek, Namibia.....
https://www.flickr.com/photos/56553919@N04/sets/72157645078039525/
President HAPS

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